Jessica Kiang

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‘Children of the Enemy’ Review: Fighting for the Children of ISIS Fighters

Whenever we see them, the seven contested children at the heart of Gorki Glaser-Müller’s taut, highly emotive “Children of the Enemy” have their eyes blurred over, to help protect their identities. It’s...

‘The Last Shelter’ Review: Scenes From a Rest-Stop on a Migrant Route Across Africa

Caritas Migrant House sits where the semi-arid Sahel region gives way to the Sahara Desert, on the edge of the urban sprawl of Gao, a town of more than 85,000 inhabitants in...

‘The Gig Is Up’ Review: The Perils of Platform Work, Personified

Californian Uber driver Annette breaks down in tears at the wheel of the car she can scarcely afford to fill with gas. In Lagos, Mitchell rarely sleeps through the night for fear...

‘All Light, Everywhere’ Review: Fascinating, Fraught and Sinister Essay on the Unreliability of the Image

A highly persuasive film about how we should be wary of film’s power to persuade, Theo Anthony’s discursive and disturbing “All Light, Everywhere” is a superb if sinister example of how the...

‘Reefa’ Review: A Trite Retelling of a Real-Life Miami Tragedy

It’s the summer of 2013 and spray cans rattle as Reefa (Tyler Dean Flores), an ambitious, 18-year-old graffiti artist, paints his signature symbol — an eye surrounded by flower petals — illegally...

‘The Return: Life After ISIS’ Review: Compassionate, Essential Glimpse Into the Aftermath of Radicalization

At irregular intervals throughout Alba Sotorra’s stirring, sobering and vitally humane new documentary “The Return: Life after ISIS,” discreet titles appear to define the foreign terms that crop up. The small group...

‘Subjects of Desire’ Review: Smart, Wide-Ranging Investigation of Black Beauty Standards

Both critical and celebratory, Jennifer Holness’ packed and penetrating documentary “Subjects of Desire” provides a superb overview of how Black culture has influenced, and been influenced by, contemporary beauty ideals from Civil...

‘The World After Us’ Review: Charming but Aimless Lessons in Parisian Life, Love and Literary Ambition

“Did you think you were making a French independent film?” rails literary agent Vincent (Mikaël Chirinian) in French independent film “The World After Us.” He’s angry with his callow young client, Labidi...

Jessica Kiang

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