Jessica Kiang

Advertisment

‘The Whaler Boy’ Review: A Potent If Uneven Coming-of-Age Drama With a Striking, Lyrical Edge

Chukotka, where Indigenous teenager Lyoshka (Vladimir Onokhov, perfectly expressive despite a face that could be carved from stone) lives a hardscrabble life in a remote whaling village, is the easternmost part of...

‘Striding Into the Wind’ Review: Bittersweet, Baggy Chinese Slacker Comedy

If the “slacker movie” moment happened in the U.S. in part as a new generation’s reaction against the economic boom — and growing income inequality — of the 1980s and ’90s, it’s...

‘Plaza Catedral’ Review: A Moving Story of Fragile Connection Across Social Divides

The striking opening shot of Abner Benaim’s plangent drama “Plaza Catedral” induces slight vertigo. The camera rises on an elevator attached to the outside of a partially built skyscraper, looking out across...

‘Do Not Hesitate’ Review: Lean, Laser-Focused Loss-of-Innocence War Drama

As sharply engineered as a reel of razor wire, Shariff Korver’s “Do Not Hesitate” is not the first film to expose the sheer lunacy of sending callow, heavily armed young men, versed...

‘Post Mortem’ Review: A Photographer Poses Corpses in Silly Hungarian Horror Hodgepodge

If you’re sick of finding pandemic parallels in everything, no need to worry about Péter Bergendy’s period horror “Post Mortem,” the Hungarian Oscar entry. It manages to avoid saying anything about our...

‘Margrete: Queen of the North’ Review: Trine Dyrholm Plays a Game of Thrones in a Lavish, Stately Historical Drama

The shadow of a certain massively popular fantasy television show looms large over Charlotte Sieling’s “Margrete: Queen of the North,” a glossy period drama that amounts to a what-if expansion on an...

‘Submersible’ Review: A Grimy, Claustrophobic, Deeply Generic Submarine Thriller

There are lost-at-sea thrillers that make a virtue of the leanness of their narratives. J.C. Chandor’s “All Is Lost,” Wolfgang Fischer’s “Styx” and Chris Kentis’ legitimately traumatizing “Open Water” (not to mention...

‘The White Fortress’ Review: Moving Portrait of Doomed First Love in Socially Unequal Sarajevo

There are three white fortresses that neatly demarcate the divides so evocatively drawn in Igor Drljača’s “The White Fortress,” recently named Bosnia and Herzegovina’s submission for the 94th Oscars. There’s the grim,...

Jessica Kiang

Advertisment