The Economist

Advertisment

Global firms are tapping India’s workers like never before

Lululemon, a CANADIAN maker of yoga outfits, does not have many things in common with Rolls-Royce, a British engine manufacturer. One thing they do share, along with scores of other foreign companies,...

Can anyone save the world’s most important diamond company?

In February 1908 Joseph Asscher, a master cutter of diamonds, cleaved the Cullinan at his workshop in Amsterdam. So tough was the South African diamond, the largest ever found, that Mr Asscher’s...

Can Nvidia be dethroned? Meet the startups vying for its crown

“HE WHO controls the GPUs, controls the universe.” This spin on a famous line from “Dune”, a science-fiction classic, is commonly heard these days. Access to GPUs, and in particular those made...

What do Joe Biden and the boss of Starbucks have in common?

IN Thomas Babington Macaulay’s “History of England”, the bustling coffeehouses of the 17th century were “the chief organs through which the public opinion of the metropolis vented itself”. But what happens when...

How not to name a new car

Bestowing a name on a car, as on a child, is not to be taken lightly. By naming his newest progeny X Æ A-XII, Elon Musk has condemned the boy to a...

Meet the Swedish firm trying to shake up heat pumps

Heat pumps, a type of reverse-refrigerator used for warming homes, are not the type of tech that gets most investors hot and bothered. They were, after all, invented in 1856. Harald Mix...

How to be a good follower

If there is one thing anyone with a job and a pulse needs to learn, it is how to lead. That, at least, is the message from the tsunami of books, courses,...

China’s youth are rebelling against long hours

It is a time-honoured tradition for bosses to grumble about the supposed laziness of their underlings. Doing so publicly, however, is rarely wise. China offers no exception to this rule. Earlier this...

The Economist

Advertisment