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The EU’s proposed carbon tariff gets a mixed reaction from industry

SINCE THE EU launched its emissions trading system in 2005, industries have followed divergent greenhouse-gas trajectories. The power sector has cut them by half. Among cement- and steelmakers, which got free allowances...

Chief executives are the new monarchs

IN THE EARLY 15th century many of the Portuguese voyages of discovery around Africa and into Asia were financed by Prince Henry of Portugal, whom historians dubbed “Henry the Navigator”. When Christopher...

The many sides to Gautam Adani

ONCE UPON a time, long before the hoodie was invented, pioneers of business preferred to call themselves self-made men rather than entrepreneurs. They built hard assets like ports, railways and oil terminals....

Semiconductors pose an unwelcome roadblock for carmakers

THE SUDDEN unavailability a decade ago of cars in “tuxedo black”, “rugged brown” or “royal red” highlighted the vulnerability of the industry’s global supply chain. The abrupt closure of the only factory...

Will Nvidia’s huge bet on artificial-intelligence chips pay off?

“WE’RE ALWAYS 30 days away from going out of business,” is a mantra of Jen-Hsun Huang, co-founder of Nvidia, a semiconductor company. That may be a little hyperbolic coming from the boss...

Why businesses use so much jargon

NO CHILD ASPIRES to a life talking the kind of nonsense that many executives speak. But it seems that, as soon as managers start to climb the corporate ladder, they begin to...

China’s techlash gains steam. Again

FIRST IT WAS fintech. fintech. Last November China’s Communist rulers abruptly suspended the $37bn initial public offering (IPO) of Ant Group, a financial-technology titan, and forced it to modify its asset-light business...

Facebook eyes a future beyond social media

FACEBOOK HAS always had two faces. One is the grimace of a company that many people, in particular politicians, love to hate. President Joe Biden recently accused the social-media giant of “killing...

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