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One stat shows Rockets shooting against Spurs was historically bad

To be fair to James Harden, he wasn't the only one who was unable to find the bucket on Thursday night in his team's playoff run-ending game against the Spurs. According to Elias Sports (via ESPN Stats & Info), his entire team had a historically bad shooting night: Of course this doesn't excuse Harden, who was the second-leading scorer in the league this season with an average of 29.1 of his team's 115.3 points per game during the regular season. But in addition to his 2-for-11 shooting in the loss, Eric Gordon went 2-for-9 including hitting only 2 of the…
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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar praises Dirk Nowitzki, clarifies 'one-trick pony' comments

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar clarified some of his previous comments about Mavs star Dirk Nowitzki.(Photo: Robert Deutsch, USA TODAY) NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar last year tabbed Mavericks vet Dirk Nowitzki as a “one-trick pony” without a “dominant career,” while dismissing the German 7-footer’s legacy in the process. After a season in which Nowitzki joined the 30,000-points club and further decorated his career, Abdul-Jabbar backpedaled on that perspective — or rather clarified his stance. The 7-2 Jabbar won six NBA titles — five with the Lakers and one with the Bucks — as one of the game’s best prototypical big men, impacting the sport…
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Secret Shows, Underground Comedy, and Undiscovered Talent in Seattle

Comedy Nest’s Underground Safe Space Putting the open in open mic, the Comedy Nest (formerly the Comedy Womb) in the Grotto—the subterranean space at the Rendezvous in Belltown—provides a supportive comedy environment devoid of hateful humor: no misogyny, racism, homophobia, transphobia, or body shaming allowed. With half of the spots reserved for women, the Comedy Nest mixes local regulars, first-timers, and a weekly featured headliner to nurture a standup show that’s both hilarious and welcoming. comedynestseattle.com[1] Tech History at Paul Allen’s Living Computers: Museum and Labs Tucked in a nondescript brick warehouse in SoDo, Paul Allen’s shrine to computer geekdom…
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A Fiendish Conversation with Laura Kaminsky

Sometimes a more intimate, personal show calls for a less grandiose venue. Such is the case for Seattle Opera, which leaves the comforts of McCaw Hall and heads to Washington Hall to stage the Seattle premiere of As One[1]. Conceptualized and composed by former Cornish music chair Laura Kaminsky (with a libretto by Mark Campbell and filmmaker Kimberly Reed), the opera tells a story of self-discovery for transwoman named Hannah. The interesting wrinkle comes from the lead (and lone) role being simultaneously split between a male baritone and a female mezzo-soprano, who are musically accompanied by a string quartet. Over…
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Burned Out on Walking Dead? Try These Four Horror Shows Featured

If you're like me, you were on board with Rick and the gang up until a point--maybe that point was season 4, where you felt like you just couldn't take another day inside the prison. Or maybe it was just recently, when you realized the show had jumped the shark over and over again, this time landing in a shallow pool with a muddy payoff and no respect for core cast members. But if you're a horror fan who wants to get a fix from binge watching a quality T.V. show, it might seem like your options are limited. Walking…
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The Hollow Core of 'Bad Apples'

While the very idea of a rock musical set against the backdrop of the Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse scandal may make many people reflexively cringe, it's not fundamentally abhorrent on principle. There are plenty of musicals that seem like terrible ideas on paper. (A hip-hop musical about one of the founding fathers? That sounds awful.) But attempting an Abu Ghraib musical instantly puts the degree of difficulty for the show at a 10 out of 10. Every aspect must be executed perfectly for the production to avoid landing flat on its face. ACT Theatre's Bad Apples doesn't come…
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The Top Things to See and Do in Seattle: Fall 2016

Visual Art Yves Saint Laurent: The Perfection of Style Few fashion designers reach artistic visionary status. Yves Saint Laurent was undoubtedly one of them. During his 44-year career, the Frenchman created sophisticated haute couture dresses and runway-worthy ready-to-wear outfits. He pushed for practicality in women’s style, making sleek pantsuits and adding pockets to dresses. The Perfection of Style features 100 garments, plus photographs, drawings, and films that illustrate the master’s process. Oct 11–Jan 8, Seattle Art Museum, seattleartmuseum.org[1] Concert The Julie Ruin Kathleen Hanna has been a musical, political, and style trendsetter since she began howling at Olympia house shows…
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The Best of Bumbershoot 2016: Saturday

Pony TimeKEXP at 3 After seven years and close to 200 local gigs, Pony Time, Seattle's most rocking garage punk duo, has reached its end point. Earlier this summer the group announced its Bumbershoot set will serve as its grand finale. While bassist/vocalist Luke Beetham and drummer Stacy Peck will continue to deliver some of Seattle's most fun rock music with their other bands (Stallion and Childbirth, respectively), take advantage of one last chance to go crazy and truly make Pony Time all the time. The Improvised Shakespeare CompanyBagley Wright Theater at 5 We still consider William Shakespeare one of…
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A Fiendish Conversation with Eric Neuville

Love is in the air at Seattle Opera, assuming the laughs of The Wicked Adventures of Count Ory don’t drown it out. While most of the men from a French village are away fighting the Crusades, noted lothario Count Ory spends his days comforting local women. When the count and his page become embroiled in a love triangle—battling for the affections of Countess Adèle—Ory’s plot to sneak into her castle becomes an operatic, cross-dressing, madcap farce. It's hard to think of a more fun way for Seattle Opera to kick off its 2016–17 season. And perhaps no one has more…
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A Fiendish Conversation with R. Hamilton Wright

There certainly value in vapid entertainment that lets you turn off your brain and decompress (hello, reality TV), but for the inquisitive mind, little can match the stimulating thrills of a heady mystery. That's why people continue to love Sherlock Holmes. Whether via Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's classic novels, Cumberbach, mouse, or Iron Man, there seems to always be an appetite for Holmes employing his unparalleled analytical brilliance to solve Victorian/Edwardian cases.[1][2][3] After delighting Seattle Rep audiences with 2012’s The Hound of the Baskervilles[4], England’s most famous detective is back on the case in the world premiere of Sherlock Holmes…
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