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Ovechkin played through hamstring, knee injuries in playoffs

Washington Capitals left wing Alex Ovechkin (8), from Russia, is taken to the ice by Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman Brian Dumoulin (8) during the second period of Game 7 in an NHL hockey Stanley Cup Eastern Conference semifinal, Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)(Photo: The Associated Press) ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — Washington Capitals superstar Alex Ovechkin played through hamstring and knee injuries that hampered him in the playoffs. Ovechkin says he felt something in his hamstring during Game 3 of the second-round series against the Pittsburgh Penguins and needed injections to numb the pain the rest of the…
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New Landscaping Gives a Sand Point Home Curb Appeal

The first time Marion Richards saw the house in North Seattle’s Inverness neighborhood in 2007, she didn’t even want to go inside. “It looked like a box—square and modern looking, with none of that Northwest charm,” she recalls. But seeing the owner’s friendly wave on her way out the door, vacating the house for Marion’s scheduled showing with the realtor, she felt obliged to keep their appointment. She and her husband Mike had moved to Seattle from England a year earlier, and because Marion was pregnant with their first child and didn’t yet have a green card, her job was…
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Trade Secrets: Make Houseplants Thrive

CINDY KREPKY and her husband own and operate Dog Mountain Farm and the School of the Lost Arts on a 20-acre spread in Carnation, where they teach kids how to live off the land. Goats and chickens mingle among more than 250 varieties of crops—everything from beets and potatoes to lilacs and sunflowers, all grown without the use of pesticides or chemical fertilizers. Even if your thumb isn’t quite so green, Cindy swears you can keep your potted plants happy. 1. Good soil biology is the key to a healthy plant, so make your own compost. Save table scraps in…
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Trade Secrets: Make Houseplants Thrive

CINDY KREPKY and her husband own and operate Dog Mountain Farm and the School of the Lost Arts on a 20-acre spread in Carnation, where they teach kids how to live off the land. Goats and chickens mingle among more than 250 varieties of crops—everything from beets and potatoes to lilacs and sunflowers, all grown without the use of pesticides or chemical fertilizers. Even if your thumb isn’t quite so green, Cindy swears you can keep your potted plants happy. 1. Good soil biology is the key to a healthy plant, so make your own compost. Save table scraps in…
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Farm Your Backyard

IN THE YEARS before I became a backyard gardener, I would always get the itch to grow vegetables in July. The sun was out, I was warm and bursting with energy, and family friends would serve me homegrown zucchinis, beans, and early tomatoes so delicious they weakened my knees on the first bite. At my exclamations of delight, these backyard farmers would always say the same thing, “They’re not that hard to grow, you know. You can do it yourself.” Yeah, right. Even then, I knew about life cycles. My friends had carefully laid soil and compost over seeds the…
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Tomatoes from Another Time

It had been years since I last grew Brandywines, so last spring I decided to have another go with the late-season heritage tomatoes. I planted two starts in my raised-bed garden, and two more in large pots. But by the middle of summer I thought I’d made a mistake. Their potato-leaf foliage was lush, and they were flowering, but no fruit was yet reflecting the sun. Come to think of it, what sun? Even my pale Norwegian skin couldn’t get a blush from that shy orb. Maybe I should have stuck to reliable, if smaller, short-season tomatoes. But the Brandywine…
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Stage Right

THANKS TO OUR TEMPERATE climate, winter gardens don’t have to be an empty stage waiting for spring’s array of colorful actors. Instead they can offer a beautiful show filled with texture, tantalizing scents, colorful blooms, and a few stars of their own. Every great production needs a strong backdrop, and few plants shine in the winter
like mahonias. Garden designer Loralee Wenger incorporates the tall, architectural evergreen shrubs into her landscapes for their fall and winter blooms of sunny yellow flowers. “I love the texture of their leaves, and the blossoms are fabulous, especially on ‘Arthur Menzies’ and ‘Charity’,” she…
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Gardening in the City Featured

Living in the city and growing your own food might seem like opposites to you, but they are actually two very interconnected pursuits. By growing a city garden, you can provide healthy, pesticide-free produce for your family while engaging in a fun, fresh-air activity. Think you don’t have room? Container gardens in pots of various sizes can hold several types of vegetation. Tomatoes, beans, strawberries, and herbs grow well in containers. If you have yard space, remove the sod (and call the public utilities department for information on composting) or grass. Add topsoil or compost to turn the area into…
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3 Backyard Hideaways

The Dual-Purpose Shed Katherine Anderson’s Seward Park garden shed sprouts a wild head of hair in summer. Poppies bloom bright orange, white, and rosy pink across the living roof, giving the contemporary structure—framed with weather-rusted steel and clad in ipe wood slats—a colorful mane. It’s a far cry from the mess of ivy and cold concrete that once overwhelmed the backyard. “I’m a florist and landscape architect, so I spend a lot of time in the garden,” says Anderson, owner of Capitol Hill flower shop Marigold and Mint. “And our kids’ bikes, kayaks, and pool toys needed to go somewhere…
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3 Seattle Gardens That Feed the City

Seattle Youth Garden Works Farm At two farmers markets every spring and summer—Wednesdays in Wallingford and Saturdays in the U District—you can buy fresh produce directly from the kids ages 16 to 21 who planted and grew it at the Seattle Youth Garden Works Farm. Margaret Hauptman started the program in 1995 as a way to aid the number of homeless youths seeking out services in the U District. In 2010 the program merged with Seattle Tilth as both an employment program for homeless and underserved youth and as a local, organic garden. To help raise the $200,000 annual cost…
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